Celtic Tree of Life at Apple Hollow Farm

THE CELTIC TREE OF LIFE


The Celtic Tree of Life is a well-known symbol often seen on tapestries, and on other types of art and decor. For the Ancient Celts, the Tree of Life was a symbol of balance and harmony. Trees in general were an integral part of the Celts' culture and beliefs, with the Celtic Tree of Life holding great importance. The Tree of Life was a representation of how Nature's forces combined to create balance and harmony. This idea can be explained by envisioning how different trees combine together to make up a forest. Trees have big branches and grow tall, similar to the way in which the forces of Nature are widespread and strong. Trees combine their life forces to provide homes for countless species. The cycles of life are balanced. The Celtic Tree of Life is a symbol for these ideas.

History of the Celtic Tree of Life

The Tree of Life was called crann bethadh by the Ancient Celts, who believed that it had magical powers. Celtic people honored the Tree of Life by leaving a large tree in the middle of their fields when they cleared their land. Underneath the branches of this tree, the Celts held gatherings and appointed their chieftains. The tree was able to provide shelter, food, and medicine, leading the Celts to believe that it had enough power to care for all life. Chopping down the tree was considered a serious crime meaning that the biggest triumph one would be able to achieve over their enemy was to chop down their Tree of Life.

Symbolism

The Celtic Tree of Life symbol has many different interpretations. The Tree of Life is a representation harmony and balance in nature. The Tree of Life, to the Celts, symbolized strength, a long life, and wisdom. The tree also represents rebirth, as it will lose its leaves during the fall season, lie dormant throughout the winter, and will be reborn once spring arrives. The Celts also believed that they actually came from trees, and considered them magical, living beings. Trees were said to guard the land, and act as a doorway to the spirit world.

The Tree of Life connects the lower and upper worlds as its roots grow far down while its branches reach high. The tree trunk connects both of these worlds to the Earth’s plane. It was with this connection of worlds, that it was said that people are able communicate with the gods in the heavens using the Tree of Life. Celtic Knots

Celtic knots are referred to as endless knots due to the fact that they do not have an end or a beginning. The endless knots represent the eternalness of nature. Tree of Life knots symbolize the branches and roots of a tree which are woven together to show the continuity of the cycle of life. The Celtic Tree of Life knot is associated with positive energy, making it a widely used design for tattoos and other art.


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Thanks to Ashley, of the Creative Girls Adventure Book Club who suggested this page -
and thanks to Jan for letting me know about it.

And, thanks to the unknown person who launched it originally.
And thanks to the Cast Paper Artist for the lovely Celtic Tree of Life image.




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Mac This page last updated: 15 September 2016